Darkest before dawn-1

Darkest before dawn-1
Matthew 14:25 “And in the fourth watch of the night Jesus went unto them, walking on the sea.”

I believe you must have heard this idiom before: “It is always darkest before dawn.”

The saying probably emanated from the Greeks and Romans in ancient times, especially with the way they describe time. According to history, the Greeks and Romans divided the night into four watches, which was later adopted by the Hebrews. These four watches are military periods representing the time a soldier remained on duty.

The first watch is between 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.; the second is between 9 p.m. to 12 a.m.; the third is between 12 a.m. to 3 a.m. While the fourth is between 3 a.m to 6 a.m.

In scriptures we understand that many significant events took place during this time frame, for example; Jacob wrestling with God (Genesis 32:24); the drowning of the Egyptian army (Exodus 14:27); the announcement of the birth of Jesus (Luke 2:8); Jesus also rose from the dead at the fourth watch (Matthew 28:1).

The interesting thing however is the fact that scientists said the fourth watch, which is the last watch before daybreak is usually the darkest hour of the night. That’s when we have pitch darkness.

We might not know while several significant biblical events took place at night and especially during the fourth watch but one lesson to glean from it is this: The darker the night, the closer our victory!

Once the night has grown to its darkest moment, it has expended all its energy and it is about to give way! The fourth watch is the period in which light is about to overcome darkness and force it’s self to the fore.

During the fourth watch, the devil seems to muster all his forces to stop light from breaking forth but eventually loses his grip. Darkness always gives way to light. Evil will eventually bow before the good.

To be continued…

Love you BiG

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